Connect with us

Entrepreneur Stories

Playboy: The Success Story Of Hefner’s Empire

Avatar

Published

on



Do you know about the most read men’s magazine which has been popular for more than four decades? The sales for a single issue of this magazine hit seven million by the early 1970s. Sounds familiar, right? Every other man was holding a copy this magazine back then. Any guesses? We are speaking about the most sold magazine of all times Playboy. Hugh Hefner and his remarkable magazine Playboy solely changed the story of the adult entertainment industry and became a multimillion dollar business endeavour that expanded to incorporate television, web ventures, clubs and more. The magazine was a game changer in the era of ‘70s where people were more conscious of what is being displayed and what’s not.

Playboy’s founding story

Hugh Hefner, the founder of the epic magazine had first shown his interest in publication at an early age. In high school he founded his school’s newspaper taking it as an opportunity, young Hefner illustrated his own comic book, School Daze. Although he had a high IQ of 152, Hefner was never really spirited about school, in general. However, after completing his schooling, Hefner joined the United States Army. Later, he went on to attend classes at the Chicago Art Institute. After two years at the Art Institute, Hefner attended the University of Illinois in Champaign-Urbana, where he obtained his bachelor’s degree in the year 1950. It was in the year 1952, Hefner started working as a cartoonist for the famous Esquire magazine. While working there, he was turned down for a $ 5 raise, he took it to heart and decided to quit his job at the publication. He went on to venture out on his own and the rest we know is history! In 1953, Hefner founded Playboy magazine using his $ 600 bucks and several thousand more he borrowed including $ 1,000 from his mom.

The rise and fall and rise of Playboy

The first issue of Playboy published in December 1953. The magazine featured nude photos of Marilyn Monroe and sold over 50,000 copies. As we all know, controversial stuff sells fast! Playboy had its strategies right and by the year 1958, the magazine’s annual profit was $ 4 million and Hugh Incredible Hefner had skyrocketed to fame. Over the years, apart from controversial stuff, Playboy’s publication of writers including Ray Bradbury, Ian Fleming, Joseph Heller, Jack Kerouac and Margaret Atwood became famous overnight. Also, Miles Davis was the magazine’s first interview. Other interviews included Fidel Castro, Frank Sinatra, Marlon Brando and the then presidential candidate Jimmy Carter, who confided that he had committed adultery in his heart. John Lennon before dying had spoken to Playboy in 1980 as well. Playboy became known for its sexually explicit content. By 1970, Hugh Hefner had gone from beginning an entrepreneurial endeavour in his own home to being the founder of a major corporation. The distribution of the magazine was extensively done and copies were selling at rates of seven million copies per month. The year 1972 earned Hefner a twelve million dollar profit.

The magazine’s monthly distribution was reaching new heights. Yes! An enormous 7 million issues were sold in 1971. By that time, nearly one quarter of  American young lads were buying or subscribing every month, according to a source. However, post that, Playboy saw a downfall in the late ‘80s and the franchise was struggling hard to reach out to the people. In the year 1994, Hefner established the Playboy Jazz Film Festival, funded by Playboy. The festival was the first showcase on the West Coast for rare jazz films and was free to the public. The franchise was slowly and steadily gaining its pace. Nevertheless, Hefner’s brainchild was back with a bang in the early 2000s with the release of his reality television show on E!. The program The Girls Next Door portrayed the lives of his three blonde girlfriends at the Playboy Mansion. The series was a super hit and doubled the popularity of Hefner between the years 2005 to 2010.

In the year 2017, Hefner died in Los Angeles at the age of 91. At the time of his death, Hefner’s global brand had an estimated net worth of at least $ 110 million. As of now, Playboy earns most of its money by licensing the bunny brand for a variety of products including liquor, clothing, fragrances, jewellery and bath products.

Cooper Hefner, Hefner’s son and the Chief Creative Officer of Playboy Enterprises, said in a statement …my father lived an exceptional and impactful life as a media and cultural pioneer and a leading voice behind some of the most significant social and cultural movements of our time in advocating free speech, civil rights and sexual freedom. He defined a lifestyle and ethos that lie at the heart of the Playboy brand, one of the most recognizable and enduring in history.

Watch the success story of Playboy here,

Loading...
Loading...
Continue Reading
Advertisement
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Entrepreneur Stories

Rupert Murdoch Unknown Facts

Avatar

Published

on

Rupert Murdoch Unknown Facts,Rupert Murdoch Amazing Facts, Rupert Murdoch Facts, Rupert Murdoch Facts 2019, Rupert Murdoch Interesting Facts, Rupert Murdoch Latest News, Rupert Murdoch Success Story, Interesting Facts 2019, startup stories, Surprising Facts About Rupert Murdoch

Rupert Murdoch is an Australian born businessman and the founder of News Corp, who turned media into a lucrative business empire.  With holdings in The Wall Street Journal, HarperCollins, Fox News and 20th Century Fox, Murdoch is one of the richest people in the world.  Here are some unknown facts about the media mogul who is considered the inventor of the modern tabloid.

 

Unknown facts about Rupert Murdoch

1. As an ambitious 7 year old, Rupert Murdoch would hunt water rats for their skin and manure, which he would then sell for sixpence in his town.  He would use his earnings to gamble in school.

 

2. Murdoch was an excellent cricket player and led his school’s cricket team to National junior finals.

 

3. His journalism career began with the Adelaide News, which he took over after the death of his father at the age of 22. Rupert Murdoch transformed the failing business into a successful newspaper.

 

4. He once counter bid for a New Zealand local newspaper, The Dominion, at the spur of the moment during a vacation and ended up winning the bid.

 

5. He was once declared dead by his own newspaper, The Sun, after digital vigilante groups Anonymous and LulzSec hacked into the newspaper website and published an article, claiming Murdoch died because of drug overdose.

 

6. He has appeared in two episodes of the hit series The Simpsons and his entrance line was “I’m Rupert Murdoch, the billionaire tyrant, and this is my skybox.

7. Murdoch has a bad intuition towards social media, which was proven when Myspace, which Murdoch bought for $ 580 million, had to be sold due to its poor performance.  He also passed a chance to buy Twitter and warned investors against investing in it. 

 

8. He was awarded a papal honour award, Knight Commander of the Order of Saint Gregory the Great, by John Paul II in January 1998.

 

9. He once launched world’s first iPad only daily newspaper app, named The Daily.  Murdoch invested $ 30 million in building the app. The app eventually shut down as the company started losing money after the launch.

 

10. He was inducted into the TV Hall of Fame in 2014 for launching Fox Broadcasting Company and changing the television landscape with shows like The Simpsons and The X-Files

With a career spanning almost 6 decades, Rupert Murdoch saw many failures and controversies, but overcame them all and is now worth $ 21.9 billion.

Continue Reading

Entrepreneur Stories

Women Scientists Turned Entrepreneurs

Avatar

Published

on

Women Scientist Turned Entrepreneurs,Startup Stories,Female Scientist Turned Entrepreneurs,Women Entrepreneurs,Scientist Entrepreneurs,Successful Women Entrepreneurs,Female Entrepreneurs,Inspiring Women Entrepreneurs,Famous Female Entrepreneurs

There are hundreds of innovations and discoveries born in the field of science and engineering every year in universities around the world.  However, only a few of them are able to make it into commercial ventures. Today, we will be looking into women who turned their groundbreaking research into successful businesses.

 

1) Nina Tandon

Nina Tandon is a biomedical engineer and co founded the company Epibone.  The main aim of the Company is to develop technology to develop bone reconstruction solution through stem cells.  The Company creates bone tissues from a patient’s stem cells and grows them in vitro for use in bone grafts. Tandon serves as the CEO of Epibone and is also an adjunct professor of electrical engineering at the Cooper Union in New York.  Tandon was named a TED Fellow in 2011 and a senior TED Fellow in 2012.  In 2013, she received an award at the Marie Claire’s Women on Top Awards.

 

2) Anuradha Acharya

Anuradha Acharya is the founder and CEO of Mapmygenome, a company which focuses on preventive healthcare options through genome sequencing.  She also founded another company called Ocimum Biosolutions, a genomics outsourcing company for discovery, development and diagnostics. In 2015, Mapmygenome made news for raising funds worth $ 1.1 million from a group of investors.  Acharya was awarded the Entrepreneur of the Year award by the magazine Biospectrum in 2008.  Her name was included in the 2018 W-power trailblazers by Forbes.

 

3) Sinead O’Sullivan

An aerospace engineer, Sinead O’Sullivan specialises in space technology and is currently  the CEO of Avioptix, a company which captures, stores and analyzes real time data from satellites, drones and ground robotics.  Her Company created the first ever platform to crowdsource drone data. Avioptix tailors their insights to the needs of their clients, supporting agriculture, oil and gas, insurance and NGOs.

4) Rana el Kaliouby

Rana el Kaliouby is a computer scientist and the co founder and CEO of Affectivia.  Affectivia is an emotion measurement technology company which develops software to recognize human emotions based on facial expressions and physiological responses.  As a research scientist at MIT, her initial focus was on ways to improve human-computer interaction, but she quickly realised the possibility of using the technology to improve human to human interaction, especially for those affected by autism.  She was inducted into the Women in Engineering Hall of Fame and was mentioned in Forbes America’s Top 50 Women in Tech 2018.

These women serve as perfect examples and inspiration for women working in the STEM field to grow their research into a business empire.  If we missed mentioning any such women scientists who turned into entrepreneurs, comment and let us know.

Continue Reading

Entrepreneur Stories

Panasonic Founding Story – Journey of Konosuke Matsushita

Avatar

Published

on

Panasonic Founding Story,Journey of Konosuke Matsushita,Startup Stories,Real Life Inspirational Stories,History of Panasonic,Panasonic Success Story,Panasonic Founder Story,Konosuke Matsushita Story,Panasonic Latest News

From starting his journey with an electric light bulb idea to creating a multinational electronics corporation, the rags to riches story of Konosuke Matsushita is truly inspirational.  Known as the “God of Management,” the founder of Panasonic was involved in many other business ventures, which, together, gave him a net worth of $ 3 billion.

 

Matsushita had humble beginnings.  Being born to a gambling father, Konosuke Matsushita started working at the age of 9 to support his family.  Eventually, he started working for the Osaka Electric Light Company, where he climbed the ladder of success very quickly, without any prior school education.  This is the company where he came up with the design of an improved light socket, which was far superior than the bulbs available at the time. After getting rejected by an unenthusiastic boss, Matsushita took it upon himself to sell the light bulbs and started his own company.

 

At the age of 23, in 1918, he founded the Matsushita Electric Industrial Company and began making light bulbs in his garage, with the support of his wife and 3 assistants.  The business was unsuccessful in the early years, but the sales picked up with time. By 1922, his Company, which now had a new factory and 50 employees, started introducing new products every single month, which were far superior than the competitors’.  Matsushita’s business strategy was to launch products which were lower in price by 30 % and better in quality by 30 %. 

The battery powered bicycle lamp is considered one of Matsushita’s  best inventions. Candles and oil lamps were used as bicycle lamps in the 1920s and only lasted a few hours.  With a keen eye to identify markets with non serviceable goods, Matsushita quickly realised, developing efficient bicycle lamps would be profitable for the Company.  He created oval shaped lamps, which had light bulbs for illumination and ran on battery. 

 

In 1930, when the Company’s sales dropped, Matsushita truly proved his leadership and  management skills. He cut the production in half without laying off any employees. He said, “We’ll halve production not by laying off workers, but having them work only half days. We will continue to pay the same wages they are getting now, but there will be no holidays. All employees should do their best to sell inventory.”  According to Panasonic, this strategy worked and the company survived.

 

In 1935, the Company, bearing in mind its various businesses, was incorporated as Matsushita Electric Industrial Co., Ltd.  The Company suffered greatly during World War II as Japan lost the War, but was saved due to Matsushita’s amazing skills as a leader.  In the post War era, the Company came out with devices like washing machines, rice cookers, air conditioners and the product for which Panasonic is most famous—monochrome televisions (TVs.)  The Company also started expanding globally during the 1950s and introduced its first colored TV set in 1960.

 

After Konosuke Matsushita retired in 1961, his son in law, Masaharu Matsushita, became the president of the Company.  Post Konosuke Matsushita’s retirement, the Company was faced with the 1970s oil crisis, but managed to overcome it and only continued to expand its business.  Konosuke Matsushita passed away in 1989, but his legacy continues even today.

 

The 101 year old Matsushita Electric Industrial Co., Ltd., which changed its name to Panasonic Corporation in 2008, is now one of the top electronics companies in the world. 

 

Panasonic now has over 272,000 employees and at the completion of its 100th year (2018,) it reported an annual revenue of $ 72.32 billion.  The Company has been climbing the ladder of success continuously. This was all made possible because of Konosuke Matsushita’s determination to succeed and excellent management skills.

 

Continue Reading