Connect with us

Entrepreneur Stories

The Secret Behind Netflix And Chill

Avatar

Published

on

The Secret Behind Netflix And Chill,Netflix Secrets to Success,Startup Stories,Latest Startup News India,Netflix Secrets 2019,Netflix Success Story,Netflix Growth Strategy,History of Netflix,Best Netflix Tips and Tricks,Netflix Marketing Strategy,Netflix Success Factors,Netflix Success Secrets


Back in the late 90’s, Reed Hastings, the man who breathed life into Netflix, realised, the way to get over avoiding late fees for the videos he rented was not by fighting the system, but by creating his own video rental platform. While the idea for Netflix came in 1997, the official website was launched on the 14th of April, 1998. Armed with an idea, 30 employees, an initial investment of $ 10 million and 925 titles to its name, Hastings and his partner, Marc Randolph, gave birth to the official Netflix website.

The beginning

For the first month, Netflix worked with a simple formula: giving people the option to browse through and rent the videos they wanted. Back then, the DVD format was just beginning to be accepted in place of VHS tapes, making it extremely easy for the team to mail videos through the rental service. By 1999, the service became extremely popular and the Netflix team decided to charge people a monthly subscription fee for renting videos!

This was a new path for the Netflix team. Not only were there no late charges, there was also no restriction on the number of DVDs you could rent and there were no shipping fees. This gave people the option to spend more time on the website by browsing through the large catalogue with complete ease! As a result of the consumer specific approach, the primary rival of Netflix, Blockbuster, suffered majorly, giving Netflix the dominance in this field. What could get better?

Unfortunately for Netflix, while their idea was spot on, the format wasn’t quite growing according to the plan for the first few years. Only a small percentage of Netflix’s regular user base had access to DVDs and VHS tapes were still a more preferred form of watching movies. Slowly through the years, as DVDs became more accepted, the online platform recorded its first ever profit ($ 6.5 million in the year 2007.) Soon after, Reed realized, they had to change the way people looked at Netflix and with this in mind, the team came up with a product which would redefine online streaming forever.

Picture credits: dbpost.com

The birth of online streaming

By February 2007, Netflix announced the streaming feature, the first ever feature which would let people watch their favourite content on the internet. The introduction of the “Watch Now” button quite literally caused a sensation. With a little over 1,000 titles, the streaming part of Netflix only made up for about one percent of Netflix’s entire video collection.

Through the years, not only did Netflix start acquiring more titles to its name, it also started giving people a new way to watch TV shows. From the moment the “Watch Now” button was introduced, users started onboarding new titles on a daily basis. By 2009, the Twitter world gave us the phrase, “Netflix and Chill,” which, although seemingly to the point and clear, has more than its fair share of hidden innuendos. By 2014, the platform had subscribers from more than 40 countries across the world and with social media being of Netflix’s best used advertising platform, people were hooked to this new phenomenon.

Picture credits: express.co.uk

The introduction of original content

Despite Netflix being at the peak of its fame, Hastings was far from being satisfied. He didn’t want to be known for sponging off existing titles, but wanted to be known for the original movies present on Netflix’s website. Introducing the concept of binge watching, the first ever series produced by Netflix was called Lilyhammer. However, this Norwegian show first premiered on the Norwegian channel NRK1 in January 2012 and in North America, on Netflix, in February 2012. This show was cancelled after its third season.

Unlike other platforms, Netflix didn’t make you wait for an entire week for one episode. It had no advertisements during the episode and it let people watch for free for the first three months. Things just kept getting better and better for the brand!

In 2013, Netflix changed the way people viewed content by privatizing the user base. By enabling the option of having individual profiles, Netflix now gave people the option of curating videos according to their preferences. While original content was one way Netflix used to market itself on a large scale, Netflix also realised that bringing to life cancelled shows was a good way to its original content. Take for example, shows like Arrested Development and Brooklyn Nine Nine. Both were immensely popular shows and when they were cancelled, they sent everyone into a tizzy. Netflix played the role of the guardian angel here and with a single swoop, renewed everyone’s hope for a better tomorrow! With shows like Daredevil, Jessica Jones, House of Cards, Luke Cage and Narcos, Netflix is the producer of some of the most popular shows in the world!

Picture credits: shutterstock

Netflix and social media

While most brand liked keeping a neutral tonality on social media, Netflix decided to do the opposite. By finding a unique voice for themselves, Netflix realised the best way to make a mark on the social media world was by being unabashedly true to the tone of your brand. In fact, their strategy worked so well, the posts made by this platform is among the best performed posts on the internet.

#Daredevil season 2. All night, every night. See you in a few hours. pic.twitter.com/O1fdynSrLa

— Netflix US (@netflix) March 18, 2016

While numbers may affect your social media game, Netflix created its social media strategy by taking into account the quality of its content, not the quantity. By using relevant posts, witty comments and listening to what people are saying on the internet, Netflix used social media to its complete advantage.

A brilliant marketing strategy, an eye for detail and clear plan to create something really unique, Netflix is today available in over 190 countries and is producing more regional content than any other competitor. Despite taking more than one hit, Netflix more than proved its superiority in the streaming world!  

Continue Reading
Advertisement
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Articles

Why Are Ads On Digital Media Failing To Reach The Right Audience?

Avatar

Published

on

Why Are Ads On Digital Media Failing To Reach The Right Audience?,Startup Stories,Digital Advertising,Best Practices from Digital Ads Experts,reasons for digital marketing failure in startups,Reasons Why Marketing Campaigns Fail,Why You Are Failing to Reach Your Target Customers Online,Missing your target audience,The Advertising Industry Has a Problem

If you are a regular user of social media platforms and also a fan of consuming content on the digital medium, then there is a very high likelihood that you have seen ads on pages you are reading or watching something.  There would be times when you have been targeted by an ad which feels like it was wrongly targeted at you.  Imagine if you are a vegetarian by choice and while browsing online, if you are targeted by a food delivery app which shows ads about chicken dishes.  The ad would only serve to spoil the mood of the online user instead of serving its actual purpose which is to push the user to buy a chicken dish.

These wrongly targeted ads might be the side effects of performance marketing or a weak brand marketing.  Performance marketing means advertising programs where advertisers pay only when a specific action occurs. These actions can include a generated lead, a sale, a click, and more.  Inshort, performance marketing is used to create highly targeted ads for a very specific target audience at a low cost.  Performance marketing usually means high volume for a very specific cost.  

Brand marketers on the other hand believe in narrowly defining target audiences but end up spending a lot of money on ad placements.  Gautam Mehra, CEO, Dentsu Programmatic India & CDO, Dentsu International Asia Pacific said, “You’ve defined a persona, you know the emotions you want to elicit, but then you buy a YouTube masthead and CricInfo sponsorships because IPL is up.  If brand advertisers look at audience-based buys more deeply than just placements, you will see more relevant ads (sic.)”  

ALSO READ: How Digital Marketing Is Impacted Due To The COVID-19 Pandemic

Performance marketing is more of a sales function rather than a marketing function and is about meeting the cost of acquisition.  This is a reason why budgets are usually high for performance marketing.  Mehra goes on to add, “the fact is that an engineer can out-beat FMCGs on performance marketing.  Advertisers who have cracked this are spending 10x and are on an ‘always on’ mode (unlike time-bound brand campaigns.)”

There is always the case of supply and demand, with the supply usually exceeding the demand on digital platforms.  Ultimately, it boils down to the choice between no ad versus low relevance ad and it is quite easy to guess that having a low relevance ad is better.  

Arvind R. P., Director – Marketing and Communications at McDonald’s India (West and South,) said “McDonalds’ for instance, has seen its share of spends on digital grow from 20% levels a couple of years back to over 40% at present.  Outcomes of this journey have been encouraging, proven by our media-mix-modelling and other key metrics.  We have seen best results from an optimal mix of Television plus digital (sic.)”  Moreover, Arvind also believes performance marketing only approach could turn out to be more suited to short term, versus a more consistent full funnel effort.  The latter ensures adequate emphasis on building consideration, as well as growing transactions.  Arvind feels digital is a complex medium which needs investment in the right talent who could use the right tools.  Brands which underestimate the need for the investment are often disappointed from the return on investment from the digital medium.

With the constantly changing consumer dynamics marketers are now shifting to unscripted marketing which frankly needs more insights into the consumer mindset.  The lack of marketers to do the proper research is why digital medium is plagued with irrelevant ads.

Continue Reading

Articles

From Unicorn To Bankruptcy; Knotel Bears The Brunt Of COVID-19 Pandemic

Avatar

Published

on

Unicorn To Bankruptcy, Knotel Bears Brunt Of COVID-19 Pandemic,COVID-19 Pandemic, Startup Stories, Public Health Emergency, Startup Knotel, American property technology, flexible workspace, unicorn, Bankruptcy, Startup Business Latest News 2021

It is no secret that in the fast paced world of startups, fortunes can change at the snap of fingers.  Sometimes startups tend to scale so quickly that they become unicorns and sometimes the fortunes reverse so quickly that a startup can immediately go bankrupt from being a unicorn.  The latter was the case for an American property technology startup Knotel, who are now bankrupt due to the disruptions by the COVID-19 pandemic.  

Knotel is a property technology company quite similar to WeWork.  Knotel designed, built and ran custom headquarters for companies which It manages the spaces with ‘flexible’ terms.  Knotel does a mix of direct leases and revenue sharing deals.  Knotel marketed its offering as ‘headquarters as a service’ or a flexible office space which could be customized for each tenant while also growing or shrinking as needed. For the revenue-share agreements, Knotel solicits clients, builds out offices, and manages properties, and shares the rent paid to it by the client with the landlord.  This model is the majority revenue generator for Knotel.

In March 2020, just before the COVID-19 pandemic unleashed its economic destruction on the world, Knotel was valued at $ 1.6 billion.  What is even more interesting is Knotel raised $ 400 million in Series C funding in August 2019 which led to its unicorn status.  However, with the COVId-19 pandemic and its consequent lockdowns and curfews by various governments across the world, startups and businesses shifted to a remote working model.  This in turn led to startups pulling out of Knotel properties to cut down on working costs.  

ALSO READ: Quibi : Startup With A Billion Dollar Launch To Shutting Down All In Six Months

In late March 2020, according to Forbes, Knotel laid off 30% of its workforce and furloughed another 20%, due to the impact of the coronavirus.  It was at this point that Knotel was valued at $ 1.6 billion.  The company had started the year with about 500 employees.  By the third week of March,Knotel had a headcount of 400.  With the cuts, about 200 employees remained with the other 200 having either lost their jobs or on unpaid leave, according to Forbes. 

In 2021, Knotel filed for bankruptcy and agreed to sell its assets to Newmark, one of their investors for a total of $ 70 million dollars.  As work culture is still undergoing changes as a consequence of the COVID-19 pandemic and with many companies realising that remote work model saves costs and improves work efficiency, the flexible workspace sector would continue to face challenges.  Knotel is just the tip of the iceberg and is a warning call for the flexible working spaces industry.

Continue Reading

Articles

5 Reasons Why Telegram Founder Pavel Durov Thinks Whatsapp Is Dangerous

Avatar

Published

on

5 Reasons Why Telegram Founder Pavel Durov Thinks Whatsapp Is Dangerous,Startup Stories,5 reasons Telegram founder ‘thinks’ using WhatsApp is dangerous,Five Reasons Why Telegram Founder Pavel Durov Thinks Whatsapp Is Dangerous,Pavel Durov,Pavel Durov Latest News,Pavel Durov About WhatsApp,Pavel Durov Sensational Comments On WhatsApp,Pavel Durov Shocking Comments On WhatsApp

Whatsapp found itself in the midst of a public relations nightmare over its latest privacy policy update.  Data privacy is currently a widely debated topic worldwide and Whatsapp has found itself in the midst of this debate time and again.  However the latest update seems to have irked a lot of people enough for them to make the shift to Telegram and the much recent app, Signal.  Telegram Messenger was launched in 2013 and although it is not as well known as Whatsapp, it enjoys quite an amount of popularity owing to its data security and encryption.

Pavel Durov, the founder of Telegram Messenger, is no fan of Whatsapp and he believes Whatsapp is dangerous and not safe.  Elucidating more on the topic, Durov made his reasons known in a blogpost he published in late 2020.  Here are the five reasons why Pavel Durov thinks Whatsapp is dangerous.

1) If Jeff Bezos’ phone can be hacked via Whatsapp then nobody is safe.

One of the richest men in the world and the founder of Amazon, Jeff Bezos’ phone was allegedly hacked by Mohammed Bin Salman, the crown prince of Saudi Arabia.  Some of Bezos’s private communications and images were taken during the hack following which Whatsapp’s security was questioned.

2) The United Nations recommends its officials to remove Whatsapp from their devices

The United Nations recommends its officials to not use Whatsapp because it thinks Whatsapp is not a secure mode of communication.  In June 2019, a U.N., spokesman Farhan Haq said, “The senior officials at the U.N. have been instructed not to use WhatsApp, it’s not supported as a secure mechanism (sic.)”  This directive came when independent U.N. experts found a possible involvement of Mohammed Bin Salman, the crown prince of Saudi Arabia, in the alleged cyber attack of Jeff Bexos’ phone in 2018.

3) End to end encryption does not guarantee security.

Durov says “in their marketing, WhatsApp uses the words “end-to-end encryption” as some magic incantation that alone is supposed to automatically make all communications secure. However, this technology is not a silver bullet that can guarantee you absolute privacy by itself (sic.)”

ALSO READ: Users Flock To Signal Messaging App After Whatsapp’s Latest Privacy Policy Update

4) Chat backups on Android and Apple cloud are not encrypted.

Pavel Durov does not believe chat backups in the cloud are safe and says “Users don’t want to lose their chats when they change devices, so they back up the chats in services like iCloud – often without realizing their backups are not encrypted.  The fact that Apple was forced by the FBI to abandon encryption plans for iCloud is telling (sic.)”

5) Backdoors continue to exist in Whatsapp

“There are backdoors.  Enforcement agencies are not too happy with encryption, forcing app developers to secretly plant vulnerabilities in their apps.  I know that because we’ve been approached by some of them – and refused to cooperate.  As a result, Telegram is banned in some countries where WhatsApp has no issues with authorities, most suspiciously in Russia and Iran (sic,)” claims Durov in his blogpost.

As data privacy is becoming more and more important in the current day and age of the internet, we wonder what messaging application is totally safe.  

 

Continue Reading
Advertisement

Recent Posts

Advertisement