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This Young Entrepreneur Believes In Making Stories Special

Ramya GovindRaj

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This Young Entrepreneur Believes In Making Stories Special,startup stories,2018 Best Motivational Stories,Startup Stories Tips 2018,startup stories india,Inspiring Success Story Of Ramya Sriram,Young Entrepreneur Ramya Sriram Special Story, cartoonist ramya sriram special story,Ramya Sriram Believes Making Stories Special,Young Entrepreneur Ramya Sriram Interview,Ramya Sriram The Tap For Making Special Stories,Young Entrepreneur Ramya Sriram Real Story

Everybody has a story to tell, and I help make yours unforgettable. – Ramya Sriram.

While a good measure of the millennials keeps wondering if their life choices are right, one young entrepreneur took charge of her professional journey and found her passion. Meet the 29 year old founder of The Tap, Ramya Sriram. Ms. Sriram enjoys expressing life through comics, using visual vocabulary to break language barriers. This simple and enjoyable hobby led Ramya into starting up her own business.

However, becoming an entrepreneur was not her first career choice. Like every child, Ramya, was very sure about what she wanted to do in her life. The only problem was her career choice seemed to change every few weeks! When she was 15, Ramya started coaching for medical school. Two years later, she dropped that idea altogether and joined the Vellore Institute of Technology, to pursue engineering instead.

Just like the majority of engineers feel in India, after graduating from VIT, Ramya believed a MBA was the next logical step. However, after joining a reputed Business school, Ramya realized Management was not her cup of tea. A few days into her course, she decided to quit and join a publishing house instead. At the new job, Ramya spent her days editing, nights writing and drawing, for the next five straight years.

During our conversation with Ramya Sriram, she shared about her journey from working in a publishing house, to the leap into entrepreneurship and setting up her own company.

1. While you made the move from MBA to publishing, who was your inspiration and why?

I never really wanted to do an MBA. I was quite confused when I started the course itself, though I had voluntarily studied for the entrance exam! What bothered me was that I might be stuck in a field that I might not enjoy. A week into the MBA, I knew that the course wasn’t right for me, and I needed to first find what kind of career I “fit” into. It wasn’t inspiration as much as it was resistance really. The major issue with the MBA was the time. Two entire years seemed an enormous amount of time to spend on something I wasn’t convinced about. When I got a job in a publishing house, my decision was made.

2. What would you tell other potential entrepreneurs who still are unable to make that final jump?

I can only speak from my own experience of running a very tiny outfit as a freelancer/self-employed person.

I would say that if the circumstances are favorable, then just take the plunge. Don’t let fear hold you back. I get so many mails from people who are really unhappy in their jobs. Life is too short to feel trapped. If there are people financially dependent on you, or if your circumstances are such that you can’t quit your job without some planning, then I suggest taking up small steps towards what you want to do. Even a couple of hours a week can make a big difference. I think the great thing about having a 9 to 6 job is that it gives you some leeway to freely experiment outside of it, since your bread and butter isn’t dependent on the experiments.

Before taking the plunge, it helps immensely to expose yourself to a variety of audiences and get feedback/advice from mentors. And when you really want to do something, you will.

Ramya’s path, from making the move from engineering, to MBA, to working in a publishing house, to finally starting her own company, Ramya has written about her journey in a Linkedin post. She states, “You can’t always find your passion within you, you have to get out there and look for it. Make things happen. Unless you try a whole variety of things, you might never know what truly brings you joy or satisfaction. As Bernard Shaw said, “Life isn’t about finding yourself. Life is about creating yourself.”

And so, The Tap was born! The Tap has now become “a storehouse for stories that originate from my wandering mind and pondering pencil.” What started off as a hobby brought in her first customer via Facebook when a friend asked her to run a comic strip for his magazine. Since then, Ramya has worked on a variety of projects that involve ideation and content creation.

3. What was the hardest part about deciding to start The Tap?

I have to admit that it wasn’t very hard, mostly because I knew what I wanted to do, and had a lot of support from my family. I had started The Tap as something on the side, along with a full-time job. By the time I decided to work solely on The Tap, I had a general idea of what kind of time, energy and effort it would involve.

I think I have to emphasize that I never really looked at The Tap as a big commercial venture or something that I wanted to grow into a big company. I wanted to focus on learning and doing good work for good clients. During the initial few months I was a little alarmed whether I could actually make it work. But there was only one way to find out.

4. What were some of the first milestones and major challenges of The Tap?

The first milestone was my first (very unexpected) commission. I was doodling for fun, and putting up my work on Facebook, when I received a request to create a custom comic. I was very surprised and happy, and that was what prompted me to start taking up paid work. Another huge milestone was Comic Con, in Bangalore. I went with some T-shirts, bags, pillow covers and coasters, and was thrilled with the response. Having your audience in flesh and blood in front of you makes such a huge difference, after an online following. The biggest thrills have come in the form of mails from readers online — lots of folks have sent me their own stick drawings — people aged 7 to 70!

The major challenge was being able to understand what the scope of The Tap was — there were so many things I wanted to do — make merchandise, take up commissions, work with social enterprises, create custom products, collaborate with other artists/writers AND continue to write. I finally decided to pick a couple of things every year.

5. What’s the next step for The Tap?

I would like to focus on social issues. I did a series with CRY India last year, and I’m hoping to work with more NGOs this year, so that people not only read the comic but there is some follow-up action. I would like to create stories that will drive people into taking positive, effective steps — though I’m not sure that can be achieved easily.

Here’s a comic I did on the International Day of the Girl Child last year.

6. What would your message be to other aspiring and confused entrepreneurs?

Well, I think the confusion is good, because it can be a great motivator. I think my advice would be to just do something which makes you wake up every day feeling excited and energetic (sic.) We are our own demons sometimes, so clearing your path of self doubt would be a good step in figuring out your next steps.

Like Ramya said, the future is all yours to grab with just a little bit of luck, a dose of courage and a whole lot of determination! We wish Ramya Sriram all the very best for her future with more projects, more milestones, more drawings and more stories!

 

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Arunachalam Muruganantham: India’s Social Entrepreneur And Menstruation Man

Ramya GovindRaj

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While a majority of men and women in many urban cities of India still consider the menstrual cycle a taboo, this man from Coimbatore changed the perspective of millions of women in rural India. Arunachalam Muruganantham, also know as PadMan, in an effort to impress his wife decided to produce sanitary napkins himself. Little did he know that a few years down the line, his whole world would be turned upside down, from almost getting a divorce to becoming the first man to wear a sanitary pad.

The initial idea seemed simple enough. Buy cotton, cut it in the size of a regular pad and wrap it using a thin layer of cotton. However, the feedback he received from his wife was devastating. His homemade pad was useless and she would rather continue using old rags. He did not stop there. He first enlisted his sisters to test his pads. When they refused, he visited a local medical school and asked the girls studying in those colleges. When they also eventually stopped helping, he created a makeshift uterus using a football bladder and goats blood to test the sanitary napkins himself.

When the neighbours started complaining about a foul smell and stained clothes, his wife left him and went to live with her mother. But, it was no longer about helping his wife anymore. Arunachalam was on a mission to produce low cost sanitary pads for all the girls and women in his country.

A school dropout from Coimbatore, Arunachalam challenged an age old taboo and changed a fiercely competitive industry with his cheap and affordable good quality sanitary napkins. After years of research, lots of sacrifices, a great deal of hard work and the willpower to succeed, he successfully created a low cost machine for the production of sanitary pads. His easy to use machines, priced at $ 950, created a revolution in India challenging the $ 500,000 imported machines. More than a decade later, his single product has helped employ more than 7000 women in rural India, selling 1,300 machines to 27 states in India and 6 countries.

However, the man behind the ‘Second White Revolution’ is still as humble as ever. Startup Stories had the opportunity to speak with Mr. Arunanchalam Muruganantham about his surreal journey. Speaking about his experiences and his journey, he says, “I feel grateful for what has happened so far it is what has made me what I’m today.” Despite changing the lives of over 3.5 million women in rural India, Arunachalam feels there’s still a long way to go. “Awareness is missing. But things do have changed compared to 2 decades before.. still a long way to go.” He further adds, “Menstrual hygiene is totally connected to a women’s health and lifestyle. Sanitary pad does play a role. We have over 80+% women not taking care of themselves. A lot of efforts needed to make them use hygienic practice.

However, Arunachalam feels the Government can help boost this movement forward. “Tax has increased the price of pads. But still. Cost is one side of the coin. Government can make it tax free – the loss they might incur is not a loss at all as making pads affordable and accessible will make more women healthy – that is a greatest asset of the nation. Women strong – country strong.”

We could not agree with him more! India is a country that has seen some extremely powerful women in the leading roles. Nevertheless, like they say, there is strength in numbers and only when men and women work together, will this revolution be validated.  It takes a lot of strength, courage and determination to take such a brave step forward. Startup Stories wishes Mr. Arunachalam Muruganantham all the best for his dream of making all the women of India use sanitary napkins.

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Bharti Foundation Donates 10% Of Family Wealth To The Giving Pledge Initiative

Smruthi Kishore

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The Bharti Family, led by industrialist, Sunil Mittal Bharti, announced early today, it would pledge 10% of its wealth (approximately Rs. 7000 crores,) including their 3%  stake in the Bharti Group flagship, Bharti Airtel, towards Bharti Foundations, the charitable arm of the organization.

With this move, the Bharti Foundation plans on significantly increasing the scope and reach of the Foundation, thereby giving the Group a wider berth for growth. Further, the Foundation plans on increasing innovative development models to support aspirations of India’s underprivileged, including the students of Satya Bharti Schools.

The Foundation works with around 2,40,000 underprivileged children in an attempt to increase the level of education provided to them. The company, in a statement, said the Satya Bharti University for Science and Technology would have a strong focus on future technologies like Artificial Intelligence, Robotics, Augmented Reality, Virtual Reality and Internet of Things, in addition to offering degrees in Electrical and Electronics Engineering and Management.

This pledge by the Bharti family is yet another example of billionaires extending into philanthropy. Infosys Chairman Nandan Nilekani recently signed the Giving Pledge Initiative sponsored by Warren Buffett and Bill Gates, which is an invitation to the world’s wealthiest to donate a majority of their wealth to charity.

The only other Indians to have signed the Giving Pledge Initiative are Wipro Chairman Azim Premji, Biocon MD Kiran Mazumdar Shaw and P.N.C. Menon of Sobha Developers. The Bharti family draws a strong influence from Mahatma Gandhi’s way of life and this move reaffirms that very fact. The Bharti Foundation helped establish the Bharti School of Telecommunication Technology and Management at IIT Delhi, Bharti Centre for Communication at IIT Mumbai and Bharti Institute of Public Policy at ISB Mohali.

Global taxi hailing startup Uber’s co founder Garrett Camp announced he’s also joining the Giving Pledge to donate at least half of their fortune to philanthropic causes. In a blog post, Camp added, “I’ve now spent 15 years focused mostly on startups and while I’m still passionate about creating useful products, I also realized I shouldn’t wait to start giving back.” 

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Watch Jan Koum’s Story Of Rising From Rags To Riches

Smruthi Kishore

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Focus on simplicity, listen to your customers and iterate if you fail – Jan Koum

Jan Koum, the founder of WhatsApp, has lived by this principle and now, he has become one of THE most successful entrepreneurs we have seen in this century. Born in Ukraine, Jan faced a life of true hardship. He knew the meaning of living in the throes of deprivation. At one point of time, Koum was so poor his house did not even have electricity.

Jan Koum’s mother decided enough was enough. When Jan was 16 years old, both him and his mother left their home in Ukraine to move to Mountain View, California, in an attempt to create a better life for themselves. Even while they moved to have a better life, they had to leave Jan’s father behind. He never made it to the states and passed away in 1997.

The great American dream did not make its way to Jan’s life as quickly as he hoped. Everything in the United States was expensive. By 18, Jan knew he wanted to learn to program. He knew this was his destiny. Jan studied by buying second hand books and stationary and returning them after he was done.

Just when things seemed to fall into place for Koum, he was hit with a major blow when his mother was diagnosed with cancer. Koum had to work odd jobs in order to scrape together enough funds to get his mother the treatment she needed. Unfortunately, she succumbed to cancer in 2000 and Koum was left to fend for himself in a strange and unknown country.

While working and studying, Koum realized nothing about college excited him and he decided to quit. In 2007, Koum joined Yahoo and this is where he met Brian Acton. Acton would become one of Koum’s closest friends. Very soon, Koum and Acton realized they were not excited about the direction in which Yahoo was going and decided quit together.

WhatsApp was developed over cups of tea. What started off as only an idea had now developed in a first of its kind, full blown app. By 2009, Jan publicly released the app and it became an instant hit. This pushed him to create the 2.0 version.

WhatsApp now has over 1 billion users worldwide and no one can seem to shake off the greatness of this app. WhatsApp was acquired by Facebook in a landmark $ 19 billion deal over the course of a few days and a bottle of Johnie Walker!

WhatsApp has come a long way from just being a messaging service, to being a globally used app that enables voice calls, video calls and provides end to end encryption of messages. Watch the amazing journey of Jan Koum from Ukraine to the United Staes of America and the development of one of the easiest and earliest messaging services, WhatsApp, here!

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